20 OCT 17 Weekly Wrap-up

Happy Friday! Thanks for checking out Bull-It Points…be sure to send your tips, criticism or compliments to chris@bullitpoints.com let us know what you like or how we can get better. — Chris Servello

Posting Saturday morning, BULL-It Points Podcast Ep3. This week’s guest is Defense reporter and author Mike Fabey. In a phone conversation with BULL-It Points, Mike discusses naval operations in the Indo-Asia Pacific, previews his new book Crashback  and talks about the need for transparent communication between reporter and subject matter expert.

Now onto this week’s wrap-up…

Key Points:

Repair and Rebuild: Balancing New Military Spending for a Three-Theater Strategy

  • The Pentagon must resolve near-term readiness issues, expand its force structure, and invest in technological breakthroughs to sustain simultaneous operations across three theaters.
  • The Army must be large enough to support stability operations in the Middle East and lethal enough to win decisively in any conventional conflicts in Europe and Asia.
  • Over the next five years, AEI’s plan would spend $672 billion above the Budget Control Act caps.

China Is Quietly Reshaping the World

  • China is quickly growing into the world’s most extensive commercial empire. By way of comparison, after World War II, the Marshall Plan provided the equivalent of $800 billion in reconstruction funds to Europe (if calculated as a percentage of today’s GDP).
  • Now it’s China’s turn. The scale and scope of the Belt and Road initiative is staggering. Estimates vary, but over $300 billion have already been spent, and China plans to spend $1 trillion more in the next decade or so.
  • According to the CIA92 countries counted China as their largest exports or imports partner in 2015, far more than the United States at 57.

Contrary to Rhetoric, Military Mishaps Have Been Declining

  • Deaths from major noncombat accidents for forces on duty did not increase but have in fact plummeted since 9/11, a Roll Call analysis shows.
  • Eleven of the past 15 years were deadlier than 2017. And the deaths have declined at a rate that does not appear to be explained solely by the reduction in the overall size of the military or its pace of training.
  • What’s more, there is no evidence that any of the accidents would have been averted by a higher defense budget. Many of the planes and ships were not especially old.

Everyone should read John McCain’s speech

  • You can read McCain’s speech as a slap at Trump. And maybe it is. You could also read it as the musings of an old man near the end of a long, storied, heroic life — a man unburdened by the vagaries of electoral politics. And maybe it is that as well.

  • Although, to be fair, McCain has never been one to shy away from taking an independent stand.

  • I choose to believe he is appealing to who we know, deep down, we really are as Americans — even if we don’t want to admit it: Pioneers. Explorers. Innovators. Entrepreneurs.

Clips:

National Security

Repair and Rebuild: Balancing New Military Spending for a Three-Theater Strategy

(AEI, 16 OCT 17…By MacKenzie Eaglen) Repair and Rebuild answers a simple question: What plans and priorities should new defense spending increases be geared toward if Congress endorses a three-theater force?1 What can actually be bought in the next five years with higher military spending? The binary construct of investing in either today’s readiness or future capability must be discarded. The military must stop looking for perfect weapons solutions to roll out in the 2030s and instead build in capacity for the inevitable international crises that will occur in the meantime. Link

Why I Went to North Korea

(New York Times, 14 Oct 17…By Nicholas Kristof ) Being on the ground in a country lets you see things and absorb their power: the speaker on the walls of homes to feed propaganda; the pins that every adult wears with portraits of members of the Kim family; the daily power outages, but also signs that the economy is growing despite international sanctions; the Confucian emphasis on dignity that makes officials particularly resent Trump’s personal attacks on Kim; the hardening of attitudes since my last visit, in 2005; and the bizarre confidence that North Korea can not only survive a nuclear war with the U.S. but also emerge as victor. Link

The World Once Laughed at North Korean Cyberpower. No More.

(New York Times, 15 OCT 17…By David Sanger, David Kirkpatrick and Nicole Perlroth)

When North Korean hackers tried to steal $1 billion from the New York Federal Reserve last year, only a spelling error stopped them. They were digitally looting an account of the Bangladesh Central Bank, when bankers grew suspicious about a withdrawal request that had misspelled “foundation” as “fandation.” Link

Behold the New Emperor of China

(Wall Street Journal, 16 OCT 17…By  Graham T. Allison) The Chinese Communist Party’s 19th Party Congress will convene Wednesday to select leaders for the next generation. Few events will have greater impact on the shape of world politics. Link

China Is Quietly Reshaping the World

(Defense One, 18 Oct 17…By Anja Manuel) China is quickly growing into the world’s most extensive commercial empire. By way of comparison, after World War II, the Marshall Plan provided the equivalent of $800 billion in reconstruction funds to Europe (if calculated as a percentage of today’s GDP). In the decades after the war the United States was also the world’s largest trading nation, and its largest bilateral lender to others. Link

Contrary to Rhetoric, Military Mishaps Have Been Declining

(Rollcall, 18 OCT 17…By John Donnelly) The summer of 2017 saw a rash of fatal military accidents — ships colliding at sea, planes crashing and vehicles catching fire — that were deadlier than attacks from America’s enemies. Still, major military accidents have been dropping, despite the spike in 2017. They are also not necessarily related to the size of the defense budget, which is at near-record levels, experts say. Link

The nature of warfare is changing. It’s time governments caught up

(Wired Magazine, 14 OCT 17…By Richard Barrons) Unless the private and public sectors start sharing ideas, the UK will be left behind in the new arms race says former Joint Forces Command chief Richard Barrons Link

Naval

Fleet and Marine Tracker

(by USNI News, Oct. 16, 2017)

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Link

Is the U.S. Navy Dying a Slow Death?

(The National Interest, 16 OCT 17…By Thomas Callender) Can today’s Navy meet the ever-increasing operational demands and deter aggressive regional threats? Assessing the fleet across three key areas—capacity, capability, and readiness—The Heritage Foundation’s 2018 Index of U.S. Military Strength evaluates our naval forces as only “marginally” up to the task. Link

The U.S. Navy May Not Be Ready for Future Fights (Think Russia and China)

(The National Interest, 17 Oct 17…By Dan Goure) For more than seventy-five years, amphibious assaults against hostile shores have had a successful record. Even when subjected to intense and protracted naval and air defenses and the nominal forerunner of today’s Anti-Access/Area Denial (A2/AD) threat, these landings were never turned back. During the Okinawa Campaign, Japan launched nearly two thousand sorties by kamikaze suicide planes, sinking 20 Allied ships, damaging almost 200 more and inflicting the highest number of U.S. naval casualties in any battle of World War Two. Once ashore, land forces often faced protracted struggles to complete the seizure of the Pacific island or break out of their beachheads in Italy and Northern France. However, no combination of air, sea and land defenses were able to prevent amphibious forces from coming ashore. Link

Why the United States Needs a 355-Ship Navy Now

(The National Review, 18 OCT 18…by Robert O’Brien and Jerry Hendrix) The failure to rebuild America’s fleet could not have come at a worse time. The world has grown increasingly dangerous, with a nuclear madman in North Korea testing an ICBM a month, mullahs in Tehran plotting the takeover of the Middle East, Russia engaging in “frozen conflicts” in Ukraine, Georgia, and Moldova, a very hot civil war in Syria, and China appropriating a vast swath of the Pacific to itself. The forgoing list does not even take into account the United States’ continuing wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and dozens of other remote locales where we are in daily combat with al-Qaeda, ISIS, the Taliban, and their assorted jihadi fellow travelers. Link

SWOs Need A “Flight School”

(Proceedings Magazine, OCT 17…by LCDR Tyler McKnight) What SWOs need is a surface version of flight school, a place where rising SWOs receive hands-on training from fleet-experienced instructors on the policies and procedures developed and agreed upon by SWO leadership. (Naval aviation has done this for decades, as has the submarine community.)  Link

Where will we be in 2030…The Future Belongs to Those Who Show Up

(USNI Blog, 18 OCT17…By CDR Salamander) Let’s talk a bit about a rising power who is primarily focused on establishing hegemony on their part of the planet – parts of which we have not been challenged on for most of living memory. Link

Communication

There are two-steps to two-way communications

(Tribe Inc, 17 Oct 17…By Elizabeth Baskin) The first step is asking for employee input. Whether it’s a formal engagement survey, a questions-and-comments feature on the intranet or employee focus groups on particular issues, people like being asked for their opinion. Link

Media

Axios Weekly Media Trends

(Axios, 17 OCT 17…By Sara Fischer) Link

Bonus:

Everyone should read John McCain’s speech

(CNN, 17 OCT 17…By John Kirby) Accepting the prestigious Liberty Medal from the National Constitution Center, he recalled a moving speech by President George H.W. Bush that extolled the bravery of those killed in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He remembered America as “the land of the immigrant’s dream, the land with the storied past forgotten in the rush to the imagined future.” Link

Upswingers and Downswingers

(New York Times, 16 OCT 17, By David Brooks) The popular gloom notwithstanding, we’re actually living in an era of astounding progress. We’ve seen the greatest reduction in global poverty in history. As Steven Pinker has documented, we’ve seen a steady decline in wars and armed conflict. The U.S. economy is the best performing major economy in the developed world. Link

13 OCT 17 Weekly Wrap

Thanks for checking out Bull-It Points. Happy Friday and Happy Birthday to the United States Navy. Congratulations to the Chicago Cubs who outlasted the Nationals to move on to the NLCS…thought it might actually be the Nats year…no such luck.

Be sure to send your tips, criticism or compliments to chris@bullitpoints.org .  Let us know what you like or how we can get better. If you would like to receive BULL-It Points via email drop us a quick note.– Chris Servello

Tomorrow…Podcast Ep 2. This week our guest is navalist Bryan McGrath (@conswahoo). In a phone conversation with BULL-It Points, Bryan gives his views on the importance of talking to national leaders and the American public about the necessity of seapower and the value of a strong Navy to national security. Additionally, he lays several thoughtful suggestions on how the Department of the Navy can improve it communication efforts. 

Key Points:

The world’s most powerful man–Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary

  • The fate of the Soviet Union haunts him, and that insecurity has consequences. He mistrusts not only the enemies his purges have created but also China’s fast-growing, smartphone-wielding middle class, and the shoots of civil society that were sprouting when he took over. He seems determined to tighten control over Chinese society, not least by enhancing the state’s powers of surveillance, and to keep the commanding heights of the economy firmly under the party’s thumb.

China congress: Military facelift a sign of bigger changes

  • Just as military reform aimed to assert civilian control over the military and spur its modernisation through initiatives like structural transformation and a strategic overhaul, the upcoming congress will likely pursue some structural changes, which can move toward improving governance.

Pentagon to shift ‘bulk’ of major defense programs to services, and people may go, too

  • “Congress been very, very clear in the last few NDAAs that they want to shift oversight of most programs back to the services, and I entirely agree with that. In fact, there were some programs that were transitioned back earlier this year,” Ellen Lord, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics (AT&L).

U.S. Navy Secretary Foresees ‘Cultural’ Shift Among Sailors, Officers

  • Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer said the “stress and strain” on Navy crews in the Pacific from the high pace of operations clearly played a role in the accidents in Asia.
  • Mr. Spencer said in an interview that he will include recommendations about cultural changes in his review of what happened. That review comes on top of one ordered by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson, which is expected to be completed in the next few weeks. Mr. Spencer’s review will follow 30 days later

Rebalancing US Navy 7th Fleet towards training, preparation is key, says new commander

  • Speaking to the media on the third day of a five-day visit to Singapore, Vice-Adm Sawyer said: “I think, over time, the balance shifted too much to the operational side, and not enough to making sure that our teams were rested, were trained, were able to go do the things we were asking them to do.”
  • “If I had the entire US Navy out in Yokosuka, Japan, I still would not be able to do all the things that everybody would want me to do.”

The Future of the U.S. Navy—Greater Partnership with Private Industry

  • The Secretary of the Navy’s (SECNAV) September 1, 2017 direction to conduct a Strategic Readiness Review of the force is an important first step in fostering new and greater relationships between the U.S. Navy and the private sector.
  • The U.S. Navy must seize on the momentum of the partnerships created in this initiative, as well as senior leadership’s recognition of the value and potential that private industry expertise, experience, and resources can have on Fleet issues and challenges.

Mattis to Generals: Start Talking to the Press

  • “Communications is the job of the commander, not just the PAO,” Mattis told a roomful of 4-stars, according to a description of the meeting by Pentagon press secretary Dana White.

eMarketer Updates US Time Spent with Media Figures

  • Individuals in the US still manage to spend the equivalent of half a day consuming media. eMarketer estimates that adults will spend an average of 12 hours, 1 minute per day with major media in 2017. People have become more efficient at multitasking, thanks largely to mobile devices (excluding voice), which will take up more than one-quarter of total media time.

Clips of Interest:

Navy Birthday

My Navy Birthday Wish…POSTER01 Twiter Instream 820

This Friday the Navy will celebrate its 242nd birthday. Like many of our own “off-year” birthdays, few people outside of the immediate family take time to mark the occasion. Please reconsider.Link

National Security

Inside North Korea, and Feeling the Drums of WarRIxd30fOt1l

(New York Times, 05 OCT 17…By Nicholas Kristof) PYONGYANG, North Korea — To fly into North Korea on an old Russian aircraft is to step into an alternate universe, one in which “the Supreme Leader” defeats craven American imperialists, in which triplets are taken from parents to be raised by the state, in which nuclear war is imminent but survivable — and in which there is zero sympathy for American detainees like Otto Warmbier.  Link

The world’s most powerful man–Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary

(The Economist, 14 OCT 17) His grip on China is tighter than any leader’s since Mao. And whereas Mao’s China was chaotic and miserably poor, Mr Xi’s is a dominant engine of global growth. His clout will soon be on full display. On October 18th China’s ruling Communist Party will convene a five-yearly congress in Beijing (see Briefing). It will be the first one presided over by Mr Xi. Its 2,300 delegates will sing his praises to the skies. More sceptical observers might ask whether Mr Xi will use his extraordinary power for good or ill. Link

China congress: Military facelift a sign of bigger changes

(BBC News, 09 OCT 17) Of the many noteworthy developments that have characterized Chinese President Xi Jinping’s first five-year term, none stands out as much as military reform, and this reveals a great deal about the coming political trajectory in China, writes political analyst Cheng Li. Link

China grabbed American as spy wars flare

(Politico, 11 OCT 17…By Ali Watkin) U.S. officials consider the abduction an unusually bold act in a long-simmering spy game between Washington and Beijing, one recently overshadowed by a newly aggressive Russia. But U.S. officials and China experts say the two countries are engaged in an espionage battle that may be just as fierce, if far less publicized. Link

Pentagon to shift ‘bulk’ of major defense programs to services, and people may go, too

(Defense News, 11 OCT 17…By Aaron Mehta) Ellen Lord, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics (AT&L), believes that her office has been given marching orders from Congress to push the day-to-day management of Major Defense Acquisition Programs, or MDAPs, to the three services. Link

Naval

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USNI News-CNA Fleet and Marine Tracker: Oct. 10, 2017

(USNI, 10 OCT 17) These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Oct. 10, 2017 based on Navy and public data. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the map reflects the location of the capital ship. Link

U.S. Navy Secretary Foresees ‘Cultural’ Shift Among Sailors, Officers

(WALL STREET JOURNAL 11 OCT 17) … Julian E. Barnes and Robert Wall LONDON—The secretary of the U.S. Navy plans to unveil potentially far-reaching changes in the wake of a deadly collisions at sea that led to the dismissal Wednesday of two top commanders. Link

Rebalancing US Navy 7th Fleet towards training, preparation is key, says new commander

(The Straits Times, 13 OCT 17…By Lim Min Zhang) SINGAPORE – The operational demands on the US Navy 7th Fleet were so high that not enough emphasis was placed on sailors’ preparation and training, said the new commander of the fleet on Friday (Oct 13). This was Vice-Admiral Phil Sawyer’s take on the preliminary findings of two collisions involving 7th Fleet ships this year. Link

South China Sea: Fourth US FONOP in Five Months Suggests a New Operational Rhythm

(The Diplomat, 12 OCT 17…By Ankit Panda) The Trump administration has accepted a higher pace of freedom of navigation operations in the South China Sea. Link

The Future of the U.S. Navy—Greater Partnership with Private Industry

(National Interest, 10 OCT 17…By Matthew Krull To improve readiness, capability and proficiency, the U.S. Navy must focus on deepening partnerships with private industry so that commercial expertise, experiences and efficiencies can be applied to the Fleet. Fostering meaningful relationships with private industry would provide a venue for innovative ideas and nondefense industry thinking to be applied to U.S. Navy challenges in areas such as safety, operations and readiness. Link

Navy Releases Final MQ-25 Stingray RFP; General Atomics Bid Revealed

(USNI, 10 OCT 17…By: Sam LaGrone) Last week, the Navy issued the RFP to four industry competitors for the air segment of what will be the service’s Navy’s first operational carrier-based unmanned aerial vehicle ahead of an anticipated contract award by September of next year, a NAVAIR spokeswoman told USNI News on Tuesday. Link

Modernization Funds Slashed For Russia’s Notoriously Rickety Aircraft CarrierURQs30fOvaW

(THE DRIVE.COM, 10 OCT 17… By Tyler Rogoway) The carrier’s long delayed deep refit and modernization program has had its budget slashed in half putting in question the carrier’s future relevance. Link

Communication

Mattis to Generals: Start Talking to the Press

(Defense One, 09 OCT 17…By Kevin Baron)On Friday, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis instructed top commanders to speak to the media more freely, Defense One has learned.The secretary is hoping to end a misperception among some senior leaders that they should keep quiet, in part because he wants them to speak up on the looming budget battle in Congress, according to a senior defense official. Link

Media

eMarketer Updates US Time Spent with Media Figures

(eMarketer, 09 OCT 17) Individuals in the US still manage to spend the equivalent of half a day consuming media. eMarketer estimates that adults will spend an average of 12 hours, 1 minute per day with major media in 2017. People have become more efficient at multitasking, thanks largely to mobile devices (excluding voice), which will take up more than one-quarter of total media time. Link

Cyber Security Awareness Month

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WASHINGTON (Oct. 3, 2017) An information graphic depicting the dangers of cyber attacks. (U.S. Navy graphic/Released)

Bonus

Axios Future Trendsb1G030fOtob

(Axios, 09 OCT 17…By Mike Allen) The Axios subject-matter experts — drawing on fresh interviews, and daily immersion in the topics driving change in business, society and the world — bring you this exclusive look ahead. Link

06 OCT 17 Bull-It Points

Happy Friday! Thanks for checking out Bull-It Points…hopefully many of you are about to start your long Columbus Day weekend. Be sure to send your tips, criticism or compliments to chris@bullitpoints.org let us know what you like or how we can get better. Also, if you would like to receive BULL-It Points via email drop us a quick note…email distribution begins next week.
New this week… “The BULL-It Points Podcast.”…posting on Saturday. Our first guest is renowned defense reporter, avid Nationals fan and all around great guy Chris Cavas. In a phone conversation with BULL-It Points, Chris gives his views on the state of our Navy and provides media tips for subject matter experts and professional communicators.–Chris Servello


Now on to this week’s wrap-up…

Key Points:

Heritage Assessment of Military Power:

  • The U.S. does not have the right force to meet a two – major regional contingency (two-MRC) requirement and is not ready to carry out its duties effectively. Consequently, as we have seen during the past few years, the U.S. risks seeing its interests increasingly challenged and the world order it has led since World War II undone.
  • The Navy’s overall score for the 2018 Index is “marginal,” the same as for the previous year…. given the continued upward trends in OPTEMPO that have not been matched by similar increases in capacity or readiness funding, the Navy’s overall score could degrade in the near future if the service does not recapitalize and maintain the health of its fleet more robustly than is now the case.

The Future the US Military is Constructing: a Giant, Armed Nervous System:

  • Every weapon, vehicle, and device connected, sharing data, constantly aware of the presence and state of every other node in a truly global network. The effect: an unimaginably large cephapoloidal nervous system armed with the world’s most sophisticated weaponry.

Improving Advice and Earning Autonomy: Building Trust in the Strategic Dialogue:

Navy Digital Warfare Office Proving Data Analytics Can Help Address Nagging Operational Problems:

  • While its ultimate goal is to influence acquisition to create a smarter data environment – much the way industry has used big data to better reach its customers, create efficiencies in production and more – the office’s first major action is to create awareness of its mission through a series of pilots that tackle readiness problems in the aviation, surface ship and personnel communities that have not been solved with traditional approaches.

Social Media is ‘First Tool’ of 21st-Century Warfare, US Lawmaker Says:

  • “We may have in America the best 20th-century military that money can buy, but we’re increasingly in a world where cyber vulnerability, misinformation and disinformation may be the tools of conflict. What we may have seen are the first tools of 21st-century disinformation.” Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va.

Clips of Interest:

National Security/Defense

An Assessment of U.S. Military Power (The Heritage Foundation, 05 OCT 17) habk30fFKKp

The Heritage Foundation Index of U.S. Military Strength gauges the ability of the U.S. military to perform its missions in today’s world, and each subsequent edition will provide the basis for measuring the improvement or weakening of that ability. Link

The Future the US Military is Constructing: a Giant, Armed Nervous System(Defense One 26 Sep 17… By Patrick Tucker)

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Service chiefs are converging on a single strategy for military dominance: connect everything to everything. Leaders of the Air Force, Navy, Army and Marines are converging on a vision of the future military: connecting every asset on the global battlefield. Link

Improving Advice and Earning Autonomy: Building Trust in the Strategic Dialogue (The Strategy Bridge.Org, 03 Oct 17…By Jim Golby)

Over the last three U.S. presidential administrations, questions about the appropriate level of military autonomy have dominated the practice of civil-military relations at the strategic level. Link

Naval

USNI News-CNA Fleet and Marine Tracker: Oct. 3, 2017 (USNI, 03 Oct 17)

fleet tracker oct 2

These are the approximate positions of the U.S. Navy’s deployed carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups throughout the world as of Oct. 3, 2017. In cases where a CSG or ARG is conducting disaggregated operations, the map reflects the location of the capital ship. Link to full tracker: Link

Special Report: Hurricane Maria (NavyLive Blog Rollup of Navy Coverage)

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Link

Here Are The Major Changes Coming To The Navy After A Year Of Deadly Mishaps (Task and Purpose, 02 Oct 17…By Sarah Sicard)

Since the Navy announced its plan to make changes during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing Sept. 19, officials have made four major moves — and the Chief of Naval Operations says there are many still to come. Link

Navy Digital Warfare Office Proving Data Analytics Can Help Address Nagging Operational Problems (USNI News, 04 OCT 17…By Megan Eckstein)

THE PENTAGON – The Navy is seeing first-hand that thoughtful data collection and analysis can go a long way in addressing lingering readiness problems, as the Navy Digital Warfare Office continues to roll out a set of pilot programs meant to introduce the service to the benefits of data science. Link

Russia’s Latest Game: Challenging NATO at Sea (Bloomberg View, 05 OCT 17, By The Editors)

Russia just conquered a fictional country, and it’s scaring the heck out of some real ones. The Kremlin’s recent Zapad war game shows the need for NATO to do more to deter Russian aggression not just on land, but also on the Baltic Sea. Link

Communication

When communicating major change, watch your step (Good Company Blog Tribe PR, 03 Oct 17…By Elizabeth Baskin)

How does a company communicate a major change? In many cases, not well. In a Tribe study with employees nationwide, 84% of respondents said their companies handle change communications “poorly.” Link

Media

Social Media is ‘First Tool’ of 21st-Century Warfare, US Lawmaker Says (Defense One, 29 Sep 17…By Jack Corrigan)

One lawmaker believes Russia’s use of social media to influence last year’s election demonstrated how warfare has moved away from the battlefield and toward the internet. And the U.S. has been slow to adjust, Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., said Thursday. Link

Does Even Mark Zuckerberg Know What Facebook Is? (New York Magazine, 03 OCT 17…By Max Read)

Mark Zuckerberg had just returned from paternity leave, and he wanted to talk about Facebook, democracy, and elections and to define what he felt his creation owed the world in exchange for its hegemony. A few weeks earlier, in early September, the company’s chief security officer had admitted that Facebook had sold $100,000 worth of ads on its platform to Russian­ government ­linked trolls who intended to influence the American political process. Now, in a statement broadcast live on Facebook on September 21 and subsequently posted to his profile page, Zuckerberg pledged to increase the resources of Facebook’s security and election ­integrity teams and to work “proactively to strengthen the democratic process.” Link

Cyber Security Awareness Month

On Data Breaches: Beware of Professional IT Pride Leading to a Fall (Government Technology, 01 OCT 17…By Dan Lohrman)

We have witnessed headline-grabbing data breaches at Equifax, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and Deloitte in the past month. Many other global companies and governments have seen massive security incidents over the past few years. There are endless lessons learned, but very few talk about this cyber blind spot that impacts us all. Link

For Fun

THE 2017 NEW ESTABLISHMENT(Vanity Fair, OCT 17)

In 2017 it seems that everyone is in everyone else’s business, and the list foreshadows the coming battles as various industries, and the titans who captain them, increasingly weave together into one. Link

29 SEP 17 Bull-It Points

By Chris Servello

Key Points:

  1. “I think China probably poses the greatest threat to our nation by about 2025.”
  2. “Successful mission accomplishment cannot be our sole measure of effectiveness.” 
  3. “If you can’t treat someone with dignity and respect, then get out.”
  4. “Connection happens when you see past the details of a task to its human consequences.” 
  5. “A PR perspective* can result in the rose-colored glasses version of company news.”
  6. “The crucial prerequisite of intelligent disagreement — namely: shut up; listen up; pause and reconsider; and only then speak — is absent.”

Clips of Interest:

Top US general: China will be ‘greatest threat’ to US by 2025*

(CNN, 27 SEP 17)… By Ryan Browne

“I think China probably poses the greatest threat to our nation by about 2025,” Dunford told the Senate Armed Services Committee during a hearing on his re-appointment as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Link

With Sweeping New Orders, Navy Vows to Focus on Seamanship and Safety

(New York Times, 28 SEP17)…By Eric Schmitt

More sleep and no more 100-hour workweeks for sailors. Ships steaming in crowded waters like those near Singapore and Tokyo will now broadcast their positions as do other vessels. And ships whose crews lack basic seamanship certification will probably stay in port until the problems are fixed. Link

Superintendent: Air Force Academy racists ‘need to get out’

(Colorado Springs Gazette, 29 SEP 17)…By Tom Roeder

At the culmination of his five-minute lecture the general barked: “Reach for your phones. I’m serious: Reach for your phones. … Grab your phones. I want you to videotape this — so that you have it, so that you can use it, so that we all have the moral courage together.” Then he said: “If you can’t treat someone with dignity and respect, then get out.” The general turned and left. Link

Great Storytelling Connects Employees to Their Work

(Harvard Business Review, 25 SEP 17)…By Joseph Grenny

People’s feelings about their work are only partly about the work itself. They are equally, if not more so, about how they frame their work. Do they see what they’re doing as a mindless ritual? Do they see it as empty compliance? Or do they see it as sacred duty? If you change the frame you change the feeling. And nothing changes frames faster than a story. Link

If You Want Employees on the Intranet, Skip the Spin

(LinkedIn, 26 SEP 17)…By Elizabeth Baskin, CEO and Executive Creative Director of Tribe, Inc.

Taking a journalistic approach to content will mean thinking through the questions employees will want answered. Telling the whole story, without sidestepping the bits that might not be such good news, results in the sort of authentic content that employees crave. Link

The Dying Art of Disagreement

(The New York Times, 24 SEP 17)…by Bret Stephens

So here’s where we stand: Intelligent disagreement is the lifeblood of any thriving society. Yet we in the United States are raising a younger generation who have never been taught either the how or the why of disagreement, and who seem to think that free speech is a one-way right: Namely, their right to disinvite, shout down or abuse anyone they dislike, lest they run the risk of listening to that person — or even allowing someone else to listen. Link

For Fun…

NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn’t happen this week

A roundup of some of the most popular, but completely untrue, headlines of the week. None of these stories are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked these out; here are the real facts: Link